Now available a reissue of Jameson Currier's debut story collection

 


 

978-0-9844707-3-0

$16

Also available in digital formats at $5.99.

Dancing on the Moon

 

short stories by Jameson Currier

From the author of Where the Rainbow Ends and The Haunted Heart, this debut collection of short stories, first published in 1993, was praised for its courageous and compassionate depiction of the impact of AIDS on gay men and their families and friends.

 


“I have read and re-read these stories, delighted in them and savored each one. How is it that fiction can so successfully transcend and translate science? Jameson Currier’s kind of fiction can recreate reality more accurately than a cinema verité account of our daily lives... Currier captures the bittersweet existence of gay men living through this holocaust, the afterglow when the bombs have fallen and before news of further devastation reaches them.”
—Abraham Verghese, The Washington Post Book World

“Defiant and elegiac.”
—The Village Voice


 

About the author

Jameson Currier is the author of seven novels, four collections of short fiction, and a memoir.

Also by Jameson Currier from Chelsea Station Editions:

A Gathering Storm; Based on a True Story;

Desire, Lust, Passion, Sex; Still Dancing; The Forever Marathon; The Haunted Heart and Other Tales; The Third Buddha; The Wolf at the Door; Until My Heart Stops; What Comes Around; and Where the Rainbow Ends.

 


Praise for Dancing on the Moon by Jameson Currier

 

“Currier’s writing has the quiet power of a river—with its depths and shallows, undercurrents, serene beauty, and its occasional sweeping rapids. These are stories we hold in each of us. Currier gives them a voice and gives them back to us.”
—Baltimore Gay Paper


As a cumulative act of witness his stories assume a sad, elegiac force... unbearably bittersweet.
—Lambda Book Report


Some people may refrain from reading Dancing on the Moon out of a discomfort with AIDS. That would be a shame, As the band plays on, AIDS spirals deeper into our lives. To ask fiction to ignore what it has always done best: mirror the times in which we live, and the ways in which we survive, Dancing on the Moon reaches to fulfill that obligation with an effort of the first order. For that reason, and for the sheer good talent of Jameson Currier, this collection deserves a wide readership.”
—Robert Drake, Baltimore Alternative